5 Tips for Setting New Year’s Resolutions

At this time of year many of you are probably considering creating your new year’s resolutions for 2011.

Some people believe these are worthwhile while others say they are a waste of time.

I set resolutions for myself each year and I think you should too.

Perry Marshall has a great way of thinking about this:

“Zero goals = zero personal accountability. Nobody ever drifts into a major accomplishment.”

Put another way, you can be passive or active about your life. Grab the steering wheel and drive towards your destination or get on the bus and hope that you’ll get there at some point.

Yeah, I know. Most people that set resolutions won’t see them through and often forget about them a month or two into the new year (or earlier!). But that doesn’t mean you have to.

It’s your choice. But if you want to be among the top 20% here’s how to set your new year’s resolutions.

Steps to setting new year’s resolutions you can (and should) actually accomplish:

1. Put them in writing. Resolutions in your head aren’t good enough. You need something down on paper, a whiteboard or your computer to hold you accountable.

2. It’s business and personal. Your resolutions should look at both your personal and business life, and how you might integrate both.

3. Set your vision. Overall what do you want the total outcome of your year to be?

Some people find setting their vision before their goals easier, while others prefer to set individual goals before creating their vision for the next year.

Do whatever works for you.

4. Set your goals. Paul Lemberg suggests that you break your goals down along these lines:

Personal Goals
• Income – think how much you want to earn.
• Wealth – think investments, real estate, etc.
• Career – career plans, the way you want to work.
• Skills – updating them, improving them, learning new ones.
• Relationships – your interactions with people.
• Experiences – travel, events, etc.
• Health – fitness, diet, weight, etc.

Business Goals
• Revenues – sales targets.
• Profits – your goal for profits.
• Products – writing a book, launching products, etc.
• Partnerships – alliances and working with others.
• Activities – your online presence, writing articles, speaking, etc.

5. Be specific. Here’s the main thing. Don’t go for broad resolutions like “I’m going to get healthy this year.” Instead, decide that “I’m going to go to the gym 5 times a week at 4pm each day”. That’s a real goal you can work towards. It’s something you can measure against. The other is more of an idea than a path to reach that goal.

We look forward to working with you and supporting you to make 2011 and very successful year!

If you have any tips that help you to set and keep your resolutions, we’ve love to hear about them in the comments below…

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  • Stan

    Very nice article Michael. I find this useful.

    • Stan – thanks for the comment and glad you enjoyed the post.

      It's great to hear that some people are finding it useful.

  • Cindy Fanner

    I too have found setting NY resolutions quite hard. Keeping them is the hardest part. I think I'm guilty of not detailing as much as I should. Thankyous for the tips!

    • Cindy – as long as you've found a way to improve – that's great and more than most people do – or ever admit they need to. Fact is, we all need to.

      Writing down your resolutions and having them in a place that you can see on a daily or weekly basis really does help.

  • Kelly

    I have to say that adding an additional step is helping me greatly. Break down those goals further and list one thing you can start today to get closer to acheiving those goals.