6 Step Process to Making More Sales: Book Review

As consultants, many of us have mixed ideas about sales.

We love to make sales; however, we don’t quite feel the same about the sales process.

Consultants and independent professionals alike feel uncomfortable with having to make sales.

For starters, the image of a salesperson has been stamped on and trashed for years. Images of used car salesmen, fast talking snake oil sellers and those that push and push some more come to mind.

Then there’s the ever tall emotional challenge of how to deal with rejection.

And cold-calling, oh, don’t get me started!

Consultants and independent professionals alike feel uncomfortable with having to make sales.

Those of you that feel this way about sales will no doubt benefit from Dave Kahle’s book “How to Sell Anything to Anyone Anytime” (published by Career Press).

For over 220 pages Kahle guides you towards achieving a new mindset around the sales process. As with any marketing consulting strategy, your sales strategy must be well thought out and planned.

Kahle provides a 6 step process to help any consultant or business owner create a more effective sales process. One that will help you overcome the previous mentioned challenges that ‘sales’ often poses.

The 6 Step Kahle Selling Process

Step 1: Engage with the right people. Too many professionals start off by targeting the wrong people. It doesn’t matter how good your product is or who ‘smart’ you are, if you’re not talking with the right people (that are suitable to buy your product) you’re wasting time and money.

As with any marketing consulting strategy, your sales strategy must be well thought out and planned.

Step 2: Make them comfortable. This is all about building rapport. Your appearance, your consulting company’s brand image, all of this comes into play. If your prospect doesn’t feel comfortable with you, they are not going to buy from you.

Step 3: Find out what they want. You may think you know, but you often don’t. Even if you’re planning on selling a business audit, if you don’t take the time to talk with your prospect and find out what they really want and what’s important to them, you won’t be able to present your services in the most attractive and relevant way.

Step 4: Show them how you can deliver what they want. Here’s a great quote from Kahle…

“Proclaiming your product’s features is the preferred routine of the mediocre salesperson. Personally and individually crafting your presentation to show the customer how what you have gives him what he wants is the mindset that, in part, defines the master salespeople.”

Step 5: Gain agreement on the next step. If you’ve done your job to this point your prospect will be ready to move forward. But closing the sale can’t happen if you don’t guide your prospect as to what the next step needs to be. Help them understand what comes next in the process.

Step 6: Follow up and leverage other opportunities. Too many people deliver their service and then disappear. That’s a shame because there is so much opportunity to not only ensure your new client is happy with the experience and product you’ve delivered, but also to discuss new opportunities for business with them and/or ask for referrals.

Kahle spends the rest of the book going into detail on each of these 6 steps. He provides stories and examples that help bring each point home.

The book is written in an easy to read manner and would be of value to any consultant, business owner or independent professional that wants to sell more. I guess that’s almost everyone!

You can grab a copy of Dave Kahle’s book on Amazon here.

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  • I am so thankful to open this kind of site of yours because you really helped me so much to know how and what to do when there are things that will happen like this..because honestly i really don’t know what to do in terms of same topic .
    THANXS FOR SHARING

  • Make them feel comfortable. This might a little difficult since some people are irate but this can be easy if you’ll put yourself in their shoes. Don’t just sympathize. Empathize.