Chasing a Lost Dragon

Chasing Lost Dragon

The Chasing Dragon Cafe opened up several months ago. Their story is one you need to learn as a consultant and marketer of your own services.

The cafe is on a very visible street corner. Tens of thousands of cars and likely hundreds of thousands of people see the cafe each day.

It pays to specialize. When you do, you’ll be known and remembered for something, instead of nothing.

When you walk in the decor is simple, calming and pleasant. It’s a breath of fresh air in a landscape surrounded by national and global coffee chains.

The space is large, great for meetings, to read a book or get some work done.

The coffee and tea are above average. The staff are knowledgeable and friendly.

You might think that this new cafe has all the ingredients to be a success.

You’d be right, many of the critical factors of business success are here. But the Chasing Dragon has one major flaw…

It doesn’t know who it is.

The Dragon Cafe wants to be everything to everyone.

It’s called a Cafe, which in this city means a coffee shop. A place you can go to get a great coffee, tea, pastry or sandwich.

The problem is first visible before you even enter the café.

The sign outside the door got my marketing ‘warning bell’ ringing.

The sign listed: coffee, steamed buns, noodles, and pizza.

That alone would usually turn me off from entering such a place. But I had a meeting around the corner and figured I’d give it a try and grab a tea.

I walked in, impressed by the interior and asked the manager about the concept of the place…still wondering what they were thinking with that sign.

The manager, a white guy, told me it’s a Hong Kong style cafe with food and drinks.

Interesting, I thought.

If it’s a Hong Kong style cafe, why doesn’t it say that anywhere? Why does the menu list pizza? Where is the authentic Hong Kong staff? And why are you serving coffee and noodles together?

If your foundation isn’t in place, if you don’t have a clear specialization and focus, and if your offer doesn’t give the market what it really wants – your business won’t take off.

The Dragon, may have started out with a clear concept. But it’s obvious that they deviated from their original plan and decided to offer as many things to as many people as they possibly could.

They went general, instead of specializing.

And while the concept may work in another marketplace (though I’m not sure it would) it certainly doesn’t work in a city where we have hundreds of restaurants and cafes that each specialize in either steamed buns, noodles, pizza, coffee and tea.

If you’re a consultant and are trying to be known as an expert of everything, you’ll end up being known as an expert of nothing.

It doesn’t matter if you have a great location, friendly staff or try the latest marketing tactic to win more clients and customers.

If your foundation isn’t in place, if you don’t have a clear specialization and focus, and if your offer doesn’t give the market what it really wants – your business won’t take off.

I walked by the Chasing Dragon the other day. The windows had brown paper covering them and a “For Lease” sign on the door.

It pays to specialize. When you do, you’ll be known and remembered for something, instead of nothing.

If you’re looking to build a marketing system that consistently and predictably attracts your ideal consulting clients, take a look at this.

Check out our fully updated Consulting Success System! Learn More and Buy Now.
  • Grey & white

    You are right, this is a major issue because businesses tend to think the more they do the more profit, but not so, I always say look for a product or service!

    • http://www.consulting-business.com/ Michael Zipursky

      Thanks for the comment and happy new year to you!

Close Download your FREE Consulting Resources

Get our Consultants Toolkit with marketing template and calendar, consulting strategies, productivity tips and more for FREE.

WHERE SHOULD WE EMAIL YOUR CONSULTANTS TOOLKIT?

* We respect privacy and never send junk mail