Consulting Sales: Focusing On What’s Really Important

Not too long ago I wrote a post about an issue that affects many consultants, what I call ‘Build Syndrome‘.

The response was positive. It seems like the post really resonated with many of our readers and we received a slew of comments from consultants from around the world.

As I read through and responded to the comments I felt there was a need for a follow-up piece … that takes the issue one step deeper.

Let’s dig into the core…

My last post explained how the Build Syndrome consumes the energy and efforts of many consultants.

I rallied that we need to avoid getting caught up in trying to make everything perfect … and instead just get out there and take action.

Rather than creating and ‘building’ so much, we should build quick and spend our time launching, learning (by speaking with clients and prospects) and improving.

If you followed my advice on the above you’d be ahead of many of your competitors.

However, keeping yourself busy isn’t necessarily a good thing.

As I said before, too many consultants are keeping themselves busy by building. Fewer, yet still too many, are busy implementing and taking action on their plans. However, most of them won’t reach success simply by doing what they’re doing.

How can that be?

The reason is actually quite simple. They may be busy implementing their plans. But their plans don’t focus on the most important aspect of every business – MAKING SALES!

That’s right. When your business is getting started there’s nothing more important than focusing on making a sale.

Here’s what you need to do:

  • Review every plan you have to ensure it’s end game and focus is on making a sale.
  • When you attend a networking event, ask yourself will this event help me make a sale (in the case of networking it doesn’t mean you have to sell at the event, rather that the attendees will be the kind of people that will either be interested in what you’re selling or be able to refer you to someone that will be.
  • Confirm that each day or second day you’re working on a sales related activity.
  • The key issue here is that you really need to figure out who you want to sell to and how you’ll go about doing that.
  • Then spend as much time as you possibly can going after sales.

Building all the time won’t make you a sale.

Simply keeping busy won’t help you make a sale (unless your activities are sales related ones).

This may all sound harsh. After all, many consultants don’t like to think that they need to sell. Or aren’t comfortable with the idea of ‘selling’.

Remember, you don’t have to be the stereotypical used car salesman.

There are many ways to sell, just make sure that you’re focusing your time and energy on making sales and that selling becomes your business’ priority.

  • Susan

    Really liked this post, keep them coming!

    • Susan – thanks for the comment and appreciate hearing that you're enjoying the posts.

  • Good reminder. I struggle with the traditional definition of "selling" and don't want to come across as desperate or "pushy". Maybe it's a gender thing, but in the end, it's about sales. Like it or not.

    Still tough.

    • KCTeambuilder – no, its not just you or a gender thing. People of all types struggle with this. Focusing on sales…and not just in our minds, but actually getting down to SELLING can be a real challenge. It's worth it though and pays off. Glad you enjoyed the post!