Mountain Madness and Tasting Success

Mountain-Madness-Success

As we arrived at the base of the mountain we knew something was different.

Instead of bursting up a hill and taking a break, I’d take no breaks, climb slower and make it to the top.

We were about to start our climb to 3,700 feet. A straight climb up 2.9 km (1.8 miles).

Looking around at the parking lot we could see hundreds of people gathering.

Then we saw the sign.

It was race day.

In 15 minutes hundreds of racers would start the climb.

We had no idea it was race day.

So we had a choice to make…

We could both turn around and give up on the climb given the situation, or get moving fast and start the climb before the wave of racers came behind us.

“Let’s go for it” we decided.

We began by running up the steep rocky hill for the first minute. I could tell within that time that ‘running’ wasn’t going to last for very long.

Within a few minutes I was gasping for air. That’s when I decided I needed to adjust my approach.

Rather than aiming for speed, I’d focus on consistency.

Instead of bursting up a hill and taking a break, I’d take no breaks, climb slower and make it to the top.

Several minutes later the first racer flew past me.

Over the next 15 minutes men, women and children of all ages went by as I continued to climb.

At the quarter mark my mind started playing games on me telling me how I wouldn’t be able to finish – after all it was my first time doing this climb.

But the mind is what holds most of us back from reaching our greatest possibilities and accomplishments.

Reach the half way mark was hard. Now drenched in sweat my legs began to feel like jelly.

I continued on. Every time my mind reminded me of how hard the climb was, I focused on getting it done.

One step after the other.

I didn’t speed up, neither did I slow down. I kept up the consistency in my pace and got into a rhythm.

As soon as I reached the top and accomplished my goal the challenge no longer seemed so daunting. I’m ready to do it again and to conquer the next mountain.

Throughout the climb I often thought how so many of the things we want to be successful in life can be had if we just don’t give up.

If we don’t try to just be like or do like everyone else around us. We need to ensure we’re going the right way, and that we’re taking steps in the correct direction, but after that it’s up to us to set our pace and then focus on it until we reach our goal.

When I first arrived at the base of the mountain I looked at the hundreds of racers as a negative to the experience.

Instead, it became a driver that motivated and kept me going. In the coaching program I run for consultants, not only do people learn the right steps and direction to take, they also are held accountable and encouraged and motivated to build more momentum.

As soon as I reached the top and accomplished my goal the challenge no longer seemed so daunting. I’m ready to do it again and to conquer the next mountain.

  • Kal

    A bit confusing as one mile equals 5,280 feet.

    • Kal

      Although, I like your perseverance.

      • Thanks Kal, here’s what the trail website says:
        Trail Facts
        Length: 2.9 kilometres (1.8 miles)
        Summit: 1,127 metres (3,700 feet)
        Total Stairs: 2,830
        Statistics: Annually, over 150,000 people hike the trail.

  • Isabelle

    Hello Michael.
    I recognize this famous trail near Vancouver. I remember when I walked to the top, it was a challenge and I decided to do it in two hours instead of the time I heard people would usually do it. As you said, one step after the other, I made it to the top in two hours. I love how you use this experience as a metaphor with building a business. I remember sitting on a bench half way through, but I still made it to the top. I’m kind of sitting on a bench right now, at a temp job that pays the bills, but I’m still consistently taking actions to make my business work. Next time I’m in town, I would love to go back with you and enjoy the beautiful view from the top!
    To you success,
    Isabelle

  • Afolabi Julius

    Adaptation is critical to business success. Good knowledge remain fit to fix in all cases. Interesting business philosophy!